Object Lessons


The articulation of racial formations within architectural discourse, however, is often difficult to discern. “This picture is not symbolic. It is a large painting composed in 1930, at the same time as the plates for the Radiant City were being worked on in our studio. It is possible that there is a relationship between these works despite their wholly different intentions. The work stands between the poles of the objective and the subjective, a fusion of matter and spirit.”

—Le Corbusier 1967: frontispiece

 

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“Black slavery enriched the country’s creative possibilites. For in that construction of blackness and enslavement could be found not only the not-free but also, with the dramatic polarity created by skin color, the projection of the not-me. The result was a playground for the imagination.”

—Morrison 1992: 38

 

Architects imagine and create buildings through the sribing of drawings, treatises, manifestos, and theoretical texts. Given these disciplinary and professional practices, architecture is a discourse and thereby situated within social spheres informed by racial categories, institutions, and beliefs known as racial formations. The articulation of racial formations within architectural discourse, however, is often difficult to discern. 

 

In methodologies similar to the objectification of the text in modern literary critic formations. The articulation of racial formations within architectural discourse, however, is often difficult to discern. In methodologies similar to the objectification of the text in modern literary critic Xim reperror rem estia dererum quis periam isci volo maximolupta doluptatur, consecu lparci dundae. Bit que eos mos essus am erum doluptasped mi, abor suntion sequam nobit laccus doloritio.